andrew-slu

About Drew Gold

Drew Gold, associate professor of management, has been appointed the polling institute’s executive director. Dr. Gold earned his undergraduate degree in finance from The Ohio State University and a Ph.D. in strategy from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Before joining Saint Leo’s Donald R. Tapia School of Business, he recently served on the faculty at the University of South Carolina’s Darla Moore School of Business in its management science department for four years. Dr. Gold has worked with companies of various sizes for the last 20 years, advising them on a variety of strategic, technology, and management-related issues.

Americans favor device free family dinner, but will they follow through?

Americans hate the proliferation of mobile phones and tablets at the dinner table, according to a new survey by the Saint Leo University Polling Institute. Whether they will do something about it is another question.

According to the Saint Leo poll, 84 percent of Americans say they agree with a policy of not allowing smart phones and other handheld devices at the table during family dinner. That number climbed to 87 percent when a family has guests joining them for dinner—with women even less tolerant than men (89 percent of women compared to 84 percent of men) of phones when guests are present.

But is this a sentiment more honored in the breach than in the observance?

“Just because we say we don’t like having mobile phones at the table doesn’t mean we don’t also like to check our email or the score of the football game during a meal,” said Drew Gold, director of the Saint Leo University Polling Institute.

The online survey of 1002 adults was conducted December 1-6 and has a margin of error of about three percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 13th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Paper Holiday Cards and Letters Persist in Popularity – As Do Cash Gifts

While We’re Fond of Tradition, Online Shopping Has Plenty of Fans
You might think in this era of constant emails and social media postings that old-style paper Christmas or holiday cards and formatted letters summarizing a family’s year might be peculiarities. Not so. In a modern age, our behavior still trends toward the traditional.

That’s just one of the findings about America’s current holiday customs from the Saint Leo University Polling Institute. The poll also revealed current preferences in monetary gifts, and means of shopping, whether online or in physical stores.

The national poll of 1,002 respondents found that 43 percent of respondents send stock cards, and another 22 percent send either custom-printed cards or custom photo cards. That means that more than two-thirds of people are mailing paper holiday greetings.

What’s more, people are eager to read what they receive in physical mailboxes. When asked how much attention they pay to one- or two-page form letters that are compilations of family news from friends, 62 percent of respondents said they read the letters carefully. Another 24 percent at least skim the letters or look them over.

“People understand the world around them through stories,” Dr. Diane Monahan, a Saint Leo University communication scholar, said in commenting on why people are eager to read one another’s letters, even when they are form letters and only annual events. “We still find a need for these stories even if it’s only once a year.”
Gift Cards/Cash
The same poll found that people might be conflicted about what form a gift should take. And it makes a big difference whether you are giving or receiving a gift.

People were presented with the hypothetical example of a gift of $25 in value. When asked if they would […]

By |December 13th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Mom: “Don’t You Dare Look at Your Phone at the Table!”

“No Technology at the Table” Policies Popular in Theory
If mom takes your phone away before Christmas dinner this year, don’t be surprised.

Americans hate the proliferation of mobile phones and tablets at the dinner table, according to a new survey by the Saint Leo University Polling Institute. Whether they will do something about it is another question.

According to the Saint Leo poll, 84 percent of Americans say they agree with a policy of not allowing smart phones and other handheld devices at the table during family dinner. That number climbed to 87 percent when a family has guests joining them for dinner—with women even less tolerant than men (89 percent of women compared to 84 percent of women) of phones when guests are present.
The poll found support for such a “no technology” policy stayed steady whether meals are taken at home or at a restaurant.

But is this a sentiment more honored in the breach than in the observance? Smart phones and even the bulkier tablets have become common sights at dinner tables, whether at home or out at a restaurant.

“Just because we say we don’t like having mobile phones at the table doesn’t mean we don’t also like to check our email or the score of the football game during a meal,” said Drew Gold, director of the Saint Leo University Polling Institute.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 13th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Floridians agree Congress is failing, according to new poll

Floridians may be divided on their political preferences for president and governor but they all agree they don’t like Congress. Congress’s approval rating is just 11 percent, with 83 percent disapproving of the job Congress is doing. Remarkably, in polling 310 Floridians 40 and older, the survey failed to find a single one who said they “strongly approve” of Congress.

“Congressional approval ratings are almost always at or below presidential approval ratings,” noted Mr. Orlando. “Voters tend to approve the job that their own member of Congress is doing, while blaming all of the maladies of the institution on the other 434 House representatives that they don’t have a hand in electing.”

The Florida voter survey of 400 adults was conducted December 1-8 and has a margin of error of 5 percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 12th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Incumbent Gov. Rick Scott trails former Gov. Charlie Crist

In the Florida governor’s race, former Gov. Charlie Crist holds a 46-34 percent lead over incumbent Gov. Rick Scott. Scott’s numbers are weighed down in part by some cracks in his own base. While 63 percent of Republicans have a favorable view of Scott, just 59 percent of Republicans say they would re-elect him. A significant percentage of Republicans hold an unfavorable view of Scott (24 percent) and 17 percent say they plan to vote for Republican-turned-Democrat Crist.

“Crist has strong support among Democrats,” Mr. Orlando noted. “This is remarkable because Democrats in Florida are giving him a chance, despite his past association with the Republican Party. It will be interesting if this party-switching honeymoon effect will last over the course of the gubernatorial primary.”

The Florida voter survey of 400 adults was conducted December 1-8 and has a margin of error of 5 percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 12th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Florida Republicans back natives Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie may top the GOP field among a general audience, but he has competition for the affections of Republican primary voters. Slightly more likely-voter Republicans say they could support native sons Jeb Bush (44 percent), the former governor, and current U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (42 percent), if they were to run than Christie (38 percent).

U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky (30 percent), Paul Ryan (28 percent), and U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas (24 percent) also have large numbers of voters who say they could support them. Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, and former U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum of Pennsylvania all have double digit followings as well.

The Florida voter survey of 400 adults was conducted December 1-8 and has a margin of error of 5 percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 12th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Clinton, Christie party favorites in Florida, according to new poll

The two most popular politicians among Florida voters are New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, according to a new poll by the Saint Leo University Polling Institute.

Clinton, a Democrat, is viewed favorably by 59 percent of Florida likely voters and unfavorably by 37 percent, for a net favorability rating of +22. Christie, a Republican, has a favorability rating of 55/29, for a net favorability rating of +26. This compares to Vice President Joe Biden’s favorability rating of 50/44 (+6) and that of former Republican vice presidential nominee and current U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin (39/40 (-1).

“While Hillary Clinton is the overwhelming favorite among Floridian Democrats, the picture for Republicans is much less clear,” said Frank Orlando, instructor of political science at Saint Leo University. “This poll contains good news for Chris Christie, whose support among Republicans in the Sunshine state is almost as high as native sons Jeb Bush and Marco Rubio, and higher than any other national Republicans, including Paul Ryan.”

The Florida voter survey of 400 adults was conducted December 1-8 and has a margin of error of 5 percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 12th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

New Florida Poll: Chris Christie, Hillary Clinton Most Popular Among Florida Voters

Favorite Sons Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio Get Encouragement from GOP
Clinton Favorability Among Democrats hits 91 percent
Florida Governor’s Contest: Crist Leads Scott, 46-34
The two most popular politicians among Florida voters are New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former First Lady and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, according to a new poll by the Saint Leo University Polling Institute.

Clinton, a Democrat, is viewed favorably by 59 percent of Florida likely voters and unfavorably by 37 percent, for a net favorability rating of +22. Christie, a Republican, has a favorability rating of 55/29, for a net favorability rating of +26. This compares to Vice President Joe Biden’s favorability rating of 50/44 (+6) and that of former Republican vice presidential nominee and current U.S. Rep. Paul Ryan of Wisconsin (39/40 (-1).

Should Clinton run for president, she would receive a warm embrace from Florida Democrats. Clinton’s favorability rating among Democrats stands at 91 percent, with just 6 percent taking an unfavorable view of her. Nine in 10 Democrats (89 percent) said they would consider supporting her, if she ran for president. Comparatively fewer said the same about Biden (34 percent). New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo (23 percent), U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts (19 percent), and U.S. Sen. Corey Booker of New Jersey (11 percent) also registered double-digit support numbers.

Christie may top the GOP field among a general audience, but he has competition for the affections of Republican primary voters. Slightly more likely-voter Republicans say they could support native sons Jeb Bush (44 percent), the former governor, and current U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio (42 percent), if they were to run than Christie (38 percent). U.S. Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky (30 percent), Paul Ryan (28 percent), and U.S. Sen. Ted […]

By |December 12th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Congressional Approval Rating Continues to be Abysmal

Americans seem to unite on one point: Everyone hates Congress, according to a new national poll released by the Saint Leo University Polling Institute. Congress’s approval rating is just 15 percent, with 80 percent disapproving on the job Congress is doing. A full 58 percent say they strongly disapprove of Congress.

The online survey of 1002 adults was conducted December 1-6 and has a margin of error of about three percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 11th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments

Tea Party Dazzles Conservatives But Little Else

The tea party continues to polarize the public, according to a new national poll conducted by Saint Leo University Polling Institute. The tea party is popular among Republicans and conservatives, but is very unpopular among both liberals, moderates, Democrats, and independent voters. Among conservative voters, the tea party’s favorability rating is 61 percent favorable, 22 percent unfavorable. Among moderates, it’s 19 favorable/62 unfavorable. Among liberals it’s 14 favorable /74 unfavorable.

“The messaging for the tea party has been hijacked by moderates and liberals,” said Frank Orlando, instructor of political science at Saint Leo University. “Few people know what the tea party stands for anymore. It’s a term that gets thrown around for things that Republicans do that people don’t like.”

The online survey of 1002 adults was conducted December 1-6 and has a margin of error of about three percent.

To view poll results click here.

By |December 11th, 2013|Institute|0 Comments